DeMont Gold Finch Electric Guitar Review

Courtesy of DeMontGuitars.com

Cost: $999.00 for this model, but check out options on their site or find one on Reverb.com!

Overview and Final Score: 8.9

The DeMont Goldfinch caught my eye the minute it popped up on my screen. The distinctive finch pickguard, offset body, and gold foil pickups make it one of the most unique guitars I’ve reviewed all year. The Goldfinch is made of Silver Poplar with a Walnut top paired to a Quarter Sewn Rock Maple neck. The Walnut fretboard holds 22 frets on a 25.5″ scale length build. All lumber is milled, dried, and cut by the crew over at DeMont, giving you a truly American-made boutique guitar for a surprisingly not-boutique price. The two pickups are controlled by a blend knob, which takes the place of a traditional 3-way selector switch, by letting you roll on different mixes of the two pickups’ signal in addition to just neck, bridge, or an even split. The two gold foil pickups are microphonic to mimic the classic, vintage guitars produced in Chicago in the ’60s. Lastly, volume and tone controls round out this inspiring take on the electric guitar.

A close up with the stunning Goldfinch I was sent!

Sound: 9.5

The pickups are probably the best feature on the Goldfinch, giving you crazy fun sounds to mess around with. First off, the two gold foil pickups are warm, buzzy, and pretty quiet even though they are microphonic. The hand wound DeMont pickups provide a lot of sustain and chime, but really shine with a distortion or fuzz pedal cranked up. Don’t get me wrong, the clean sounds are great, clear and rich, with note to note clarity ringing out in chords. But with fuzz, this instantly takes you to the Black Keys/White Stripes world. Even better, you can get some of those delta blues tones that inspired those two bands with ease. The pickups sing and snarl and hiss with aggression but complete clarity.

The blend knob deserves a particular shout out too. You can mix and match so many tones that are not available on other guitars by controlling the signal blend between the two pickups. Of course you can get the 3 classic sounds, neck, bridge, and both together. But you can really dial in everything from warm, chime with heightened bass response to straight up round, neck tones. Using the other two knobs make it borderline limitless when it comes to tone shaping and a lot of fun to play. Fans of simplicity shouldn’t be scared either, pretty much everything sounds good if you don’t want to go searching for tones.

Playability: 8.5

The tuning stability on the Goldfinch seems phenomenal so far, with note bends and hard picking attack doing little to throw it out of pitch. The neck looks and feels great, but I have to say the gloss finish felt a little sticky, even though it seems nicely applied and thin. Perhaps it just needs to be worn in a bit, but it wasn’t a huge deal and more personal preference. I love the look of the vintage, covered bridge, but it does add a few seconds to string changing, so if you’re really picky about that take notice. Otherwise, there are no really playability flaws, the neck is smooth and fast, and I really love how easy it is to access the higher frets.

Finish & Construction: 9

The clear finish they put on these guitars is perfect because the wood they use is just naturally gorgeous. The Silver Poplar and Walnut top have this beautiful, natural grain that just looks super unique, and gives the guitar a rustic look. It’s definitely a really cool looking guitar to have on your wall or in your studio that even non-musician’s would appreciate. Besides the good looks, the guitar is just built well. It’s incredibly small and light, really deceptively small from the images. But that makes it incredibly comfortable to play sitting down or standing up. The hot pickups and light weight make it especially interesting to me for live rock shows and I would love to take this on the road for a nice Black Keys cover or two. The finish looks good, everything is screwed or wired in well, and the guitar doesn’t have a ton of buzz like I thought it would.

Value: 8.5

One of the best things about this guitar is that it mixes boutique quality and really stunning design together, all without having a really inflated price tag. Most American-made guitars are thousands of dollars while most boutique American-made guitars can be $4000-$10,000 for something that’s fairly comparable to a standard Gibson or Fender. Not the Goldfinch, it is its own beast, with a unique, “pawnshop” guitar inspired sound and artistic aesthetic. This specific model is going for $999 and will be available for purchase, but others seem to range from $750 to $1000. It’s a hell of a guitar for that price, and it’s one I certainly would want to add to my collection!

Published by

Matt Dunn

Guitar and music journalist for Ultimate-Guitar.com and Guitarsforidiots.com as well as a contributor for Guitarniche.com and Stringjoy.com. Reach out to talk about guitars or guitar music anytime.

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