Glarry GP Electric Bass Review

It looks great, and is much more comfortable than their Strat copy, but beware of poor construction

Cost: $74.99, new from https://www.glarrymusic.com

Generously sent for review by the great support team at Glarry Music!

Overview and Final Score: 4.3

The Glarry GP Electric Bass is their latest entry into their line of uber affordable electric guitars and basses. Coming in at around $75, the GP comes in 8 finish options, including this beautiful natural-type finish they call Burlywood. The basswood body features a maple neck with rosewood fretboard and 20 frets on the P Bass styled body. The split-single coil style is based on the famous P Bass style, making this a familiar sonic choice for Fender/Squier fans. The 34″ scale length bass also is also fairly lightweight, making it a good choice for players who prefer to stand and play.

Sound: 4

While some of you may see a 5 here and think that is not a good score, I personally think that’s a great score for a bass that costs about $75. I mean, it was fairly comparable to the lowest end Squier P basses I’ve played, which is saying something because their Glarry Strat copy was far and away WORSE than all Squier models. They got something right with this bass right here.

The single split coil pickup is surprisingly noiseless with only a little bit of buzz or hum. The pickup’s output is really low, which limits the potential of the bass for those who use smaller, practice amps. However, it didn’t sound too bad when boosted with distortion or fuzz, though it definitely was missing that punchiness that lets Fender’s cut through the mix. Overall, the sound would be hard to justify it as your main bass, but as a backup or practice bass it has real potential for at least sounding similar to a P bass compared to how un Strat-like their guitar sounded.

Playability: 4

Similar to their GST3 guitar, the neck is just huge on this thing. Definitely making it hard for beginners and students to learn comfortably even though the fretwork isn’t too bad. That being said, the tuning stability was much improved compared to their Strat, and was fairly comparable the Squier PJ bass I previously reviewed for the site. It’s still a bit far from a trusty Squier neck and could use a set up to lower the action, but it is certainly playable for experienced or amateur players.

Finish & Construction: 3

The finish is stunning from a visual perspective but already shows signs of scratches and chips and feels super thin. The pickups came out of the box not properly installed in the covers, which meant I had to remove the strings and pick guard, and re-install them into their covers and the body. For a beginner, this is not something they could or should probably do themselves, and any quality control agent would have noticed this had they looked at the bass. While the bass does only cost $75, I would expect them to at least give it a once over.

Shouldn’t the pole pieces be visible through those holes??

Value: 6

This is where the bass gets its highest marks as it still is an insane value for players who just don’t have access to a better instrument. At the end of the day it works, even with the pickups out of the mounting. Even though it cut even more output of the bass, it still plays, sounds similar to a Squier, and holds tune. That’s an accomplishment and if you really are incredibly strapped for money, this makes the bass guitar accessible to you. I would recommend this as a project bass, backup bass, or practice bass for more experienced players. For students and beginners I would argue it is worth the extra money for a more reliable and comfortable instrument from Squier, Epiphone, or ESP LTD.

Interested? Check the product out in the link here: https://www.glarrymusic.com/glarry-precision-electric-bass-guitar-p7.html

Published by

Matt Dunn

Guitar and music journalist for Ultimate-Guitar.com and Guitarsforidiots.com as well as a contributor for Guitarniche.com and Stringjoy.com. Reach out to talk about guitars or guitar music anytime.

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