TC Electronic Ditto Stereo Looper Pedal Review

My top rated, and go-to loop pedal!

Cost: $125.00, new or cheaper from Reverb.com

How It Works and Final Score: 8.3

The big brother of the best selling TC Electronic Ditto Looper, the Stereo version adds a few helpful tweaks to help you get the most out of your looping experience. The pedal adds a stereo I/O (or dual mono) functionality and lets you connect the pedal via USB to your computer. This way, you can upload backing tracks or import/export saved riffs. You can save riffs and loops thanks to the “store” switch that sits atop the pedal. To save a quick demo or riff, hold down on the “store” switch, export it off the pedal, and then delete it by simply holding the switch up. This pedal can be as complicated or as simple as you like, running exactly like the simpler Ditto Looper or taking on a bigger part of your digital footprint. Oh, and did I mention that stereo setup means you could have multiple rigs (bass + guitar) running into the same pedal for live shows? Imagine how tight a band could sound with that much control…

Sound: 8

When discussing the sound of a loop pedal you want to look at a few key features. First off, how is the output level of the pedal? Is it useable for live use, do you lose a lot of sound volume? How sensitive is the control, etc..Next, you want to look at the sound quality and make sure the sound it is spitting back out sounds like the original, true guitar signal. In the case of the Ditto Stereo looper you get amazing sound quality with little to no noise or buzz. It’s incredibly inspiring as a songwriter to be able to layer long, repeating chord sequences or riffs while trying to form lead lines or melodies. You can record and loop up to 5 minutes of total audio with the Ditto Stereo Looper, all with unlimited tracks. That’s a whole lot of music to create.

The only downside I noticed is that at the lower end of the volume knob, you don’t have as much control over the sound. It quickly goes from loud to too quiet. I’m not sure if all the pedals feature this (only) decent volume sweep, but for the price I was expecting a bit more control. However, it wasn’t a major issue and the pedal still provided ample amounts of playable and useable sounds and volumes.

Durability: 9

The metal case on this thing is so damn rugged, it’s probably the pedal that takes the biggest beating on my board and it still looks good as new. This pedal has now made it through 4 years on my board without a single issue, all the input jacks and connections are rock solid with no adjustments necessary or signs of wear and tear. Usually, the power connecter jack goes first on all my pedals, so far this one has had the longest life. It’s just a well built, reliable pedal. It’s as simple as that!

Value: 8

While it’s no where as expensive as some of the most complex looping systems out there, the Ditto Stereo Looper is almost $30-40 more expensive than the Ditto Looper. So unless you feel you need the USB interface or dual mono functionality, you may be better off just getting the little brother. This limits the overall value to the average player, making it a reliable if not overly complicated option for people who just play in their bedroom. Overall, I think it fits my needs perfectly and I have never regretted my purchase or looked to upgrade. I would only recommend either of the Ditto Loopers to players looking for a simple, around the house looping pedal. While the live functionality on here is great, people playing in bigger bands may want to have more control over multiple channels.

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